One Link 11/18

Wed, Nov. 18th, 2015 11:55 am
[personal profile] jazzyjj
Hello everyone. Earlier this morning a friend sent me the following link, and I'm wondering if anyone has seen or heard about this. It sounds very cool.
sasha_feather: Black, white, and red image of woman with futuristic helmet (Sci Fi Woman)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Catching up on a few posts

Mari Ness: World Fantasy Convention 2015 -- Disability and Accessibility

Mari Ness: New Accessibility and Disability Policy

File 770: Mari Ness posts World Fantasy Report and a New Personal Policy
(some faily stuff in comments)
jesse_the_k: Human in professorial suit but with head of Golden Retriever, labeled "Woof" (doctor dog to you)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
Published three times a year, the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies combines essays, ideas, and discussion between academics, non-academics and folks like us.

They've just issued a call for submissions for their theme issue on the relationships between fanfiction and disability.

The full call for papers is here:

A taste of what they want follows:
quote begins
However, disability and accessibility have not been explored in either academic or fan scholarship as crucial aspects of fanfiction practices, and disabled fans and fanfiction writers have not been included as significant contributors to online fanfiction communities.

Yet, disability and fanfiction are in a complicated relationship with one another. Fanfiction loves its disabled characters ( Stiles from Teen Wolf, Hiccup from How to Train Your Dragon, Homestuck, House, River Tam from Firefly), and loves to disable its characters (Harry Potter is iconic in this respect), to get all the feels, to explore all the possibilities, and because you hurt those you love, a lot, especially in fanfic.

Many fans and fan creators have identified online as disabled and/or people with disabilities/impairments. Fans are sharing their experiences and having discussions about disability representation in fandoms and fanfiction, about ableism and accessibility. How disability manifests in online fanfiction works and communities remains to be brought into play in critical disability studies and in fan studies.
[ snip ]
We welcome single and multiple authored pieces. Formats can be written, video (must be captioned), audio (must include transcript).
[ snip ]
Submissions are due 15 April 2016 and can be emailed to
Cath Duchastel de M. at:

quote ends

Please signal boost like there's no tomorrow.

one more link

Fri, Nov. 6th, 2015 06:24 pm
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Redefining Heroism by Jennifer Bohlman

Science fiction and fantasy tell us that anything can happen, and yet disabled people are often told that their narratives don’t fit into the genres. If anything can happen, why can’t we be heroes too?

1 link 6 Nov 2015

Fri, Nov. 6th, 2015 11:26 am
sasha_feather: Cindi Mayweather (janelle monae) (Cindi Mayweather)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Huffington Post: Sickle Cell in Primetime: How a Character Reveal on Shonda Rhime's "Grey's Anatomy" Renewed my Hope
[personal profile] jazzyjj
Hi everyone. This morning when I checked my work email, I found a message from the My Blind Spot email announcement list containing something about a webcast that actually took place exactly a week ago. Rather than tweet it out for my volunteer job and make everyone have to travel back in time, I thought I'd go to the website and see what all it offered. While there I found this and listened to it in its entirety. I think y'all will enjoy it.
jesse_the_k: John Watson regards the void looking puzzled with white puzzle piece floating above him (JW puzzled)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
Have you longed for a place on the web where disability is central but not "special"? A place where we live and write and make art as we are. Not a support group, and not about just the body, or the brain, or one particular assistive tech. A web-based zine which could include political rants and silly pictures to gaze at when the brain weasels swarm. Sex tips and cleaning tips and poetry and comics. A site where our disabled selves are the authors and the audience, and everyone else is welcome to learn.

[personal profile] lizcommotion is gathering ideas & volunteers for a "blog-zine-website type thing a la The Toast or Autostraddle, but aimed at disability-type issues or interests."

RIch discussion is happening now, including what sort of content to publish, how to fund it, soliciting volunteers and other notions -- at this post:
or via private message

[signal boosts welcome!]
sasha_feather: the back of furiosa's head (furiosa: back of head)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Tariq Moosa at Polygon: Your Body isn't your World: The Heroes of Mad Max and disability

About the Mad Max video game and franchise.

Playing as Max, experiencing characters with disabilities, is a reminder that we can and should create worlds that treat respectfully those so often forgotten - if games want to be more inclusive. It makes us feel welcome, it makes our enjoyment that much more personal: I have little doubt this feeling of empowerment has shaped my perception of what many consider a mediocre game.
[personal profile] jazzyjj
Hello everyone. For those of you in the Boston area, this sounds like it will be a lot of fun. I just tweeted this article out for my volunteer job as well.

Apologies for not shortening the link. I can do that if the original doesn't work for anyone.
jesse_the_k: Hands open print book with right side hollowed out to hole iPod (Alt format reader)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
Wolf Schweitzer, a Swiss forensic pathologist (and above-elbow amputee), has a rich blog full of details on low-tech amputee hardware design.

He also has extensive thoughts on "Mad Max: Fury Road,"
begin quote
Again, the Punch & Judy department of Warner Brothers throws a faked disability, a faux handicap, at us, in their Mad Max: Fury Road (2015) movie, and again, we consider it, just as we considered the attempts in Kingsman, or, Home of the Brave (2006), or, maybe in the ill-fated attempt for cinema titled “Hancock”.
So, here they go again; what do they do there? Is it good? And, before glorifying it just because (they even write “watch Furiosa punch Max in the face, with her nubbins” which she really doesn’t; she punches him with her hand while sticking the nubbins out in the air) – why not actually *use* our eyes, to look, to ogle, to view, and (in a more strict sense) “watch” it? It is so much a visual and so not much a verbal movie so we really have to switch on our eyesies. What is there to be actually seen, what do they really show? Is this empowering or what does it really say?
end quote

The full article is on his blog:
[personal profile] jazzyjj
Hi everyone. I had originally planned on posting something at my journal regarding the ADA'S 25th birthday/anniversary, and I might still do that. I'm thinking it over. But I thought I'd post this link here. Fyi, I'm the one who commented about being yelled at by a couple voc/rehab people. Here it is:
[personal profile] jazzyjj
Hi everyone. Just came across this in my work email earlier this morning and posted it to our Twitter timeline. I'm also posting it here. I've actually heard a few Story Corps interviews, and they always seem to be very well done and inspiring even if they are a bit sad at times. Enjoy! .

I briefly checked out this website and it seemed to refresh a bit with VoiceOver, but I'm going back there later because I couldn't devote much time to it. In addition, I think I've found an accessible program which will let me run Windows on here.

1 link 9 July 2015

Thu, Jul. 9th, 2015 08:10 pm
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
David Perry at Chronicle Vitae:
Removing the Barriers to Participation for Disabled Scholars

About access at Academic Conferences
davidgillon: A pair of crutches, hanging from coat hooks, reflected in a mirror (Default)
[personal profile] davidgillon
When a friend noted she was planning to go to 9 Worlds/Geekfest, due to be held 7-9th August at Heathrow, I was initially excited, I'd missed going to Eastercon for health reasons and this looked like a good substitute. Heathrow is a bit too far to commute from Kent, so I went to check the con hotels for accessibility, and that was when I was left with a nasty taste in my mouth.

How to Book A Hotel Room

The convention hotel for 2015 is the Radisson Blu Edwardian Heathrow, on Bath Road just north of London Heathrow Airport. Rooms at the Radisson are now sold out. We've agreed convention rates at two nearby hotels:

  • Renaissance Heathrow - £89 / night for one person or £99 for two. The Renaissance is on the other side of Bath Road. It's close to the Radisson, but you have to cross over pedestrian crossing points as Bath Road is a large dual carriageway. The crossing points are unsuitable for motorised wheelchairs as they are not properly lowered. It's about a five minute walk at 'standard' walking speed. Google Maps walking directions are incorrect for this route as you can just go straight between the two sites.
  • Park Inn Heathrow - £86 / night for two people, or £77 for one person. The Park Inn is also on Bath Road, on the same side of the road as the Radisson, but there are a couple of junctions, a few unrelated buildings, a petrol station and a McDonald's between the two hotels. It's about an eight minute walk at 'standard' walking speed​​.

Both hotel rates include free breakfast and in-hotel wifi. Bookings are made with the hotel rather than Nine Worlds, and they can take bookings over the internet or by phone. For wheelchair users, we would advise considering the Marriott hotel. The Marriott is slightly closer than both of these - it's further down Bath Road on the same side as the Radisson, has good access facilities, but we were unable to agree an affordable room rate with them.​​​​ It's about three minutes walk at 'standard' walking speed, with one junction to cross.

 (my italics, note that the pricing information given for the 'official' con hotels isn't repeated for the one wheelchair users are being advised to use - too embarrassed? Note also that there is no indication as to whether the junctions between the Park Inn and the Radisson have kerb-cuts - and the petrol station and McDonalds are likely to be a problem for that. And if the route from the Renaissance isn't suitable for motorised wheelchairs due to lack of kerb-cuts it probably isn't suitable for most manuals either, not all of us can wheelie up a 6" kerb)

From the access page

Whoa there! This policy is from Nine Worlds 2014. We're at the same hotel for 2015's Nine Worlds, but we're still reviewing all of the content on this page.

 (my italics, it's a month to the con, and you still have accessibility covered by a placeholder? Seriously?)

In summary

We’re running at the Radisson Edwardian, Heathrow. We have step-free access, accessible toilets, gender neutral toilets, designated quiet space, car parking, kid-friendly content, a minority of clearly marked 18+-only content, and space for feeding and changing. We’re running as 75-minute sessions with 30-minute breaks, and attendees can enter and leave sessions as they like. The Radisson has a limited number of wheelchair friendly / accessible hotel rooms. We recommend the Marriott next door as an accessible alternative if the Radisson books out.

(my italics, they recommend the Marriott, but don't mention it isn't a con-hotel)


Nine Worlds 2015 will be held at the Radisson Blu Edwardian, Heathrow. The following is a brief overview of some of the hotel's features from an accessibility point of view; if you have any specific access queries please contact, tweet @9Waccess or contact the Radisson hotel directly.


The main circulating and social space for Nine Worlds is in the atrium at the top of the building. Access from the lobby is by climbing 38 steps (with four landings) or by lift; the lifts are not directly in the lobby/atrium but are clearly signposted along a side corridor. Lifts are big enough for a standard wheelchair plus companion, although users of larger wheelchairs or scooters may have difficulty. The lifts contain mirrors to aid reversing out.

The atrium is naturally lit from a glass ceiling and consists of smaller self-contained areas. These are connected by walkways and shallow ramps (including temporary ramps which will be in place for the duration of Nine Worlds where necessary).

One area is earmarked for possible use as a children's area; access here is down two steps which may not be possible to ramp. More information on this will be available in due course.

The main entertainment and vendors areas are in a large room off the atrium. This room is a couple of inches below the level of the corridor, with a carpeted ramp in the doorway. The entertainments and vendors room, along with most side rooms, are carpeted. Access to this room is through double doors which are held open when the room is in use.

Direct access to the main convention bar is down two steps from the atrium; step-free access is via a ramp at the opposite end of the atrium.


 (my italics, people with powerchairs may have trouble accessing the main con area? WTF? Why are they in this hotel with so basic an access fail?And as for scored-through access information, does that mean it's no longer relevant, no longer accessible or what? Access to the bar is pretty damned fundamental as far as I'm concerned!)

Hotel layout - Marriott

.... (Note, no mention that the Marriott isn't a convention hotel, in fact no explanation why it's mentioned at all - if you can't even list the relevant hotels?)

Hotel layout - Sheraton Skyline

.... (Note, no mention that the Marriott isn't a convention hotel, in fact no explanation why it's mentioned at all - if you can't even list the relevant hotels?)

Restaurant layout - McDonald's

As a lot of Nine Worlds attendees use the McDonald's on Mondial Way outside the Radisson, we had a brief look here too. The step-free route from the pavement has narrow chicane barriers across the footway which would block access for users of most mobility aids including wheelchairs; the only way of avoiding these is via the roadway. The building has automatic doors opened by push buttons, although these were not working when we visited. Assistance dogs are welcome.

(my italics, this seems to confirm there are access issues between both secondary hotels and the main con hotel)

No access information is given for the two actual secondary con hotels, the Renaissance and the Park Inn. The price difference between the official con hotels and the one wheelies are being advised to use is marked: Radisson Con-rate: ? (not stated in faq, presumably as sold out), Renaissance Con-rate: £89, Park Inn Con-rate:£77, but Marriott £127. So that's between £38/a night and £50 pound a night extra, a minimum of £114 extra for a wheelchair user who wants to stay three nights to ensure they see the whole con.

It looks awfully like Geekfest have stuck with a semi-accessible hotel rather than look for a better one as that's convenient for them, then negotiated con-rates with different secondary hotels to last year without giving any thought to accessibility, then stuck up an oh, wheelies had better stay at the Marriott excuse when they realised it's an issue, and just hoped they could keep quiet about the cost issues this imposes on wheelchair using con-goers.

Not impressed, don't know half the information I need, have no confidence in the rest, probably not going :(


jesse_the_k: Female head inside a box, with words "Thinking inside the box" scrawled on it. (thinking inside the box)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
Video Game Accessibility: A Legal Approach
George Powers, Vinh Nguyen, Lex Frieden

The authors all work at the Southwestern (U.S.) ADA Tech Assistance Center, so they're familiar with the law and its limitations. They believe a legal approach would result in more, lasting access.

Video game accessibility may not seem of significance to some, and it may sound trivial to anyone who does not play video games. This assumption is false. With the digitalization of our culture, video games are an ever increasing part of our life. They contribute to peer to peer interactions, education, music and the arts. A video game can be created by hundreds of musicians and artists, and they can have production budgets that exceed modern blockbuster films. Inaccessible video games are analogous to movie theaters without closed captioning or accessible facilities. The movement to have accessible video games is small, unorganized and misdirected. Just like the other battles to make society accessible were accomplished through legislation and law, the battle for video game accessibility must be focused toward the law and not the market.

Full article in Disability Studies Quarterly

November 2015

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