sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Call for Panellists: ‘Positive Practice: Awesome portrayals of people with mental illnesses’ @ Nine Worlds GeekFest 2014

This is a chance to talk about characters and storylines that have resonated with us, and about what new ground we’d love to see broken in fictional portrayals.

If you’re coming to Nine Worlds 2014 and would like to get involved, let us know in an ask or by emailing queer@nineworlds.co.uk.
sasha_feather: Max from Dark Angel (Max from Dark Angel)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Activist Mia Mingus:

Access Intimacy: The Missing Link (from 2011)

Access intimacy is that elusive, hard to describe feeling when someone else “gets” your access needs. The kind of eerie comfort that your disabled self feels with someone on a purely access level. Sometimes it can happen with complete strangers, disabled or not, or sometimes it can be built over years. It could also be the way your body relaxes and opens up with someone when all your access needs are being met.
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
A review from 2013 about the show "Legit" (which I recently watched the first season of on Netflix!)

Think Progress: With 'Legit', FX Tackles Disability, Independent Living, and Sex, and makes it all very Funny

----

GabbySilang at Tumblr:

And now, too many words about mental illness in s4 of Rookie Blue

This post discusses the portrayal of a character with bipolar disorder.
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Rock, Paper, Shotgun: Accessibility Jam

The Accessibility Jam wants to give “developers knowledge and experience of how to make mainstream video games accessible to gamers with disabilities, to provide good examples of what’s possible, and move accessibility towards being widely accepted good practice in the game design process.” The jam begins in a little over 5 days and you should take part or pay attention.

---

May 15th is Global Accessibility Awarness Day aimed at digital accessibility.

Nine Worlds Con

Thu, May. 8th, 2014 04:40 pm
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
I appreciated reading this report regarding feedback and plans for future, from the 2013 Nine Worlds Con in London.

Nine Worlds Feedback Report: Access

Also includes sections on affordability and diversity.

Book review

Tue, Apr. 15th, 2014 08:13 pm
sasha_feather: Steam punk goggles (Steam punk goggles)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
A book review of The WisCon Chronicles vol. 7, Shattering Ableist Narratives.

Access and Fandom: Disability Studies From a Feminist Science Fiction Perspective

Review by Katie Wagner and Alexis Lothian.
dirty_diana: colored pencils sit in an empty latte cup. (Default)
[personal profile] dirty_diana
A rant about movie fandoms and spoilers at my journal. I thought some people might commiserate. Or tell me to get over myself. Whichever. :)
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
The Third Glance: Disney's Frozen and Autism

I’m not saying that Elsa is an autistic character. I’m not saying that autism is a superpower like the magic in the animated film (obviously it is totally different!) All I’m saying is that Elsa’s childhood and coming of age experience that is portrayed in the film has a number of parallels to my own life, especially based around my being autistic. And I wanted to recognize that, because it made me really really happy. I almost never relate to movie characters that way, but I did, and it made me smile.
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Jonathan Lavallee at Geek Feminism: Ableism in RPG gameplay

Thanks to [personal profile] j00j for this link.
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Derek Handley writing at Jim Hines' Blog:
Representation Without Understanding

At a very basic level, wheelchair users are not an under-represented group in fiction. We’re just very misunderstood.

Evil Albino Trope

Tue, Feb. 25th, 2014 02:49 pm
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Nalini Haynes writing at Jim Hines' blog:
Evil Albino Trope is Evil

The evil albino trope is lazy writing, creating a sense of ‘other’ by victimising a small minority group. The evil albino trope alienates albinos, punishing us for looking different and suffering bad eyesight. Reinforcing perceptions of incompetence and evil-ness in this people group is discrimination and victimisation.
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Ada Hoffmann writing at Jim Hines' blog: Autism, Representation, and Success

Maybe we, as autistic people, need to be shown warts and all sometimes. Maybe what we need most desperately to see is that we can be visibly disabled, and unsuccessful, and fail to meet NT expectations in all kinds of ways, and be treated with all sorts of horrible ableism, and still be human. And still be lovable and worth something, even if no one else sees it.
jesse_the_k: Macro photo of my Blue Heeler Lucy's deep brown left eye (Default)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
It IS exciting to see kids interested in engineering, and I know [personal profile] selkiechick posted with the best intention.

However, that announcement pushed a whole row of my Assistive Technology Geek buttons, and I gotta rant. I'll can use the "BRAIGO" to illustrate why I get so hot under the collar. (My cred: I've hung out with people who use assistive technology since 1982; I designed and sold braille translation software and embossers in the late eighties; and I've personally depended on assistive technology since 1991.) Based on thirty year's close attention to the development/PR/funding/purchasing/abandonment cycle for assistive technology, here's my take on the BRAIGO announcement.

DESIGNERS GET COOKIES FOR PROTOTYPES, NOT AFFORDABLE PRODUCTS )

DEVELOPMENT WITHOUT EXPERT ENDUSERS IS POINTLESS  ) That's why the BRAIGO can't create useful braille.

PR BECOMES DISINFORMATION ) A $350 embosser would be an amazing thing. Hundreds of well-intentioned editors and readers are willing to take the inventor's word for it. But this device is not a embosser.

EXPERTS ARE AVAILABLE on REQUEST! ) We live in a press release culture: what the company wants to say is what we hear. Or in this case, what a 12 year old (who mentions absolutely no contact with braille users) says gets broadcast.


FAST FACTS RE EMBOSSERS & BRAILLE )

Start from the first dot at the RNIB's Learning Braille site or pick an excellent start for adults at the Achayra firm in India. Teach more at the National Federation of the Blind's Braille is Beautiful resource for kids.

tl;dr Just because assistive technologies are tools for people with disabilities doesn't mean we must accept only good intentions. We want the best engineers working on our designs, the best marketers making them affordable, and the best politicians making them subsidized.
[personal profile] selkiechick
I am on a committee of a conventions and we are talking policy. We are talking about medical documentation requirements for accommodations, and I am having a hard time finding the right words to tell them why this is a /terrible/ idea, and as a newb of sorts, I'd love to have some authority to stand on. Is there a good blog post or website out there already outlining the reasons why that is a bad requirement, and why?

Thank you.

(I promise, my next post will have content)
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
[personal profile] kate_nepveu: Arisia Panel: Blindness: More than Metaphor

Description:

Blindness has been used as a metaphor in fiction for centuries, a way to talk about knowledge, enlightenment, ignorance and agency. But for some people it is a simple fact of everyday life. We have moved away from using gender and appearance strictly as metaphor in stories (pretty = good, ugly = bad). Are we ready to look at disabilities as part of who people are, and start including them in more kinds of stories and in more diverse roles?

Gann Monroe, Sarah Smith, Rachel Tanenhaus, W. A. (Bill) Thomasson, Tanya Washburn (m)
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
[personal profile] lightgetsin: Alt text

The point I'm getting to is if it's a question of utilitarian vs. evocative, I go evocative every time. Descriptions are opinions, yes. So have an opinion! Have fun with it. Embrace the personal nature of describing someone's art or photo. Become a participant in a pretty cool transmedia project.
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Susan Nussbaum, HuffPo Chicago:
Disabled Characters in Fiction

Disabled characters are written into stories for one reason: the disability. Do most people actually believe real disabled people spend our days obsessing about being cured? Or rhapsodizing about killing ourselves? Here is the truth: Disabled people barely ever even think about our disabilities. When we do think about them, it's usually because we are dealing with an oppressive, systemic problem, such as employment discrimination. Can't there ever be a disabled character in a book or film just because?

From 11/19/2013

September 2014

S M T W T F S
 123 456
7 89 10111213
1415 16 17181920
21222324252627
282930    

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags