sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Unobfuscated: What is accessibility?

Above all else, as accessibility professionals, we should take our actions thoughtfully, recognizing that the actions we take directly impact what people can and cannot achieve on the Web every day.

1 link 8 Feb 2015

Sun, Feb. 8th, 2015 10:07 am
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
From July 2014, on the need for web accessibility:

An Alphabet of Accessibility
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
This link is from July 1, 2013.

The Ada Initiative (which supports Women in Open Source technology and culture):
New Accessible Dropdown Menus plugin for Wordpress Now Available

The post also contains a nice bit on why Accessibility is Important.
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
LiveJournal has instituted a new "spoiler tag" that runs on Java Script. Read about it below.

[personal profile] eruthros: Oh jeez, LJ
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Sherlock)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Just in case, like me, you don't read your DW update unless you have insomnia.

From the update written by denise:

Accessibility Win: Comment Hierarchy


As of the last code push, some of you may have already noticed a major accessibility improvement: explicit comment hierarchy indicators. This is thanks to an incredibly well-thought-out suggestion by [personal profile] jesse_the_k and heroic development work by [personal profile] allen. You can now go to the Display tab of Account Settings and check "Display Explicit Comment Hierarchy Indicators (site scheme only)".

If you turn on this option, when viewing comment pages in any site skin, comments will then display an outline-style explicit numbering of comment threads, allowing people who access the site via screenreader and non-graphical browser to see the relationships of comments inside a comment thread. (It will look sort of like a content outline: 0, 1, 1a, 1b, 1b1, 1b2, 1c, 1c1, etc.)

This is a major accessibility win -- one of my screenreader-using friends didn't realize until after using LJ and then DW for about five years how sighted people were figuring out which comments were replies to which -- and one I'm really, really proud of. It took us a while to figure out the best way to do it -- [personal profile] jesse_the_k submitted the suggestion in February of 2010 -- but it just goes to show, once we file a bug for something, it will get added; we won't just give up on it.

As a reminder: Dreamwidth really cares about making the site accessible for you all. If you have an accessibility need that isn't being met, we want to hear about it. Because accessibility needs are different for everybody, and sometimes mutually-exclusive, we might not be able to fix the issue perfectly, but we will do our best to figure out a solution that will work for you. To notify us, you can post an entry to [site community profile] dw_accessibility, or contact the accessibility team project coordinator, [personal profile] rb.

Death to Captchas

Sun, Nov. 6th, 2011 11:18 am
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
John Foliot: Not the Blog Post I was going to write today

Warning for moving images and migraine triggers. The post is about a 3-D moving Captcha.

So that you don't have to click the link, I've cut and pasted the article below. There are hyperlinks in the post that do not appear here.

Read more... )
boundbooks: Zhang Ziyi (bird: blue parakeets)
[personal profile] boundbooks
The 21 October 2011 post at [site community profile] dw_news has a section about a change in Dreamwidth's code that I thought would be very relevant for this community:
As of the last code push, some of you may have already noticed a major accessibility improvement: explicit comment hierarchy indicators...You can now go to the Display tab of Account Settings and check "Display Explicit Comment Hierarchy Indicators (site scheme only)".

If you turn on this option, when viewing comment pages in any site skin, comments will then display an outline-style explicit numbering of comment threads, allowing people who access the site via screenreader and non-graphical browser to see the relationships of comments inside a comment thread. (It will look sort of like a content outline: 0, 1, 1a, 1b, 1b1, 1b2, 1c, 1c1, etc.)

This is a major accessibility win -- one of my screenreader-using friends didn't realize until after using LJ and then DW for about five years how sighted people were figuring out which comments were replies to which...

The news post also mentioned general accessibility needs on DW:
If you have an accessibility need that isn't being met, we want to hear about it. Because accessibility needs are different for everybody, and sometimes mutually-exclusive, we might not be able to fix the issue perfectly, but we will do our best to figure out a solution that will work for you. To notify us, you can post an entry to [site community profile] dw_accessibility, or contact the accessibility team project coordinator, [personal profile] rb.

2 Links

Tue, Sep. 13th, 2011 12:48 pm
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
[personal profile] lightgetsin:

Data

I was recently treated to another round of “disabled people need to just ask for accommodations, then they’d be given them,” with the usual accompaniments of “you shouldn’t be so angry” and “you should be nicer."

So I figured, okay. I know this is bullshit from a lifetime of experience, but let’s gather some data.


Currently at 214 comments.

Dance for me, internets, dance

On alt-tagging your icons.
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
[personal profile] lightgetsin: Tumblr

It goes like this:

Poster A: So I want to add image descriptions to my tumblr, but I don’t know what works and what doesn’t.
Commenter 1: Why would you do that? Tumblr is for pictures. Blind people don’t go where there are pictures.
Commenter 2: Right. Descriptions are hard, and I just want to reblog something I like. So why would I write this whole paragraph when no one will ever use it?
Commenter 3: It’s like they don’t get tumblr. It’s for pictures! It’s not my fault you can’t see them.
Me: *head explodes*.
sqbr: (up)
[personal profile] sqbr
First: Is there anyone here who uses tumblr and benefits significantly from image/video descriptions? I've been making a small effort to champion them, but apart from the sorts of things that apply intermittently to everyone (A video blocked at your work or country, comics with tiny text etc) my arguments have all been about hypothetical users and it would be useful to (a)Have some evidence against the "but noone who needs descriptions would use a visual medium like tumblr" argument(*) and (b)Get any specific suggestions you guys might have to offer (like: given the fact that long descriptions are often cut off automatically or by rebloggers, is it better to do short ones? Or do you lose too much information?)

Second: With my fanart I've been pitching my descriptions at people who are familiar with canon unless I have some particular reason to think it will be interesting to those who aren't. In general I find writing descriptions quite mentally taxing and, beyond mentioning the names of the characters and canon so that people can google if they like, trying to imagine how to make the image make sense to someone who doesn't know canon without going into a three page backstory is usually too much for me. But since I don't really use image descriptions myself I worry I may be missing something.
Read more... )
staranise: An animated movie of a kitten chasing its own tail ([personal] Fluffy kittn)
[personal profile] staranise
A friend and I are trying to write a program that produces automated fic bingo cards with cut-and-paste HTML. We want to make the resulting tables screenreader-friendly, but neither of us can find a post done a while ago about what that would entail. It was possibly in the comments of a kink_bingo post.

Does anyone know what I'm talking about? Any help would be appreciated.

Success stories

Sat, Jul. 10th, 2010 07:17 pm
duskpeterson: An apprentice builds a boat as a man looks on. (Default)
[personal profile] duskpeterson
There've been so many horror stories floating around fandom recently about prejudice against disabled folk that I thought I'd offer, as a sort of thank-you note, my own experiences in fandom, in regards to my disabilities.

Starting back in 2002 )

I've been quite pleased when the requests I made had an impact on the long-term policies of the individuals or organizations. But even in the cases of one-time assistance, I'm struck by the unfailing desire I've encountered of people wishing to help.

Reading the recent stories about disabled people in fandom, I gather I've been very, very lucky. That makes me all the more grateful.
the_jack: a low-res style drawing of Te and Jack (Default)
[personal profile] the_jack
Inspired by both the Physical Disability Bingo Card and the Invisible Disability Bingo Card (and IDBC the sequel), I'd like to make a bingo card highlighting the horrifically unhelpful things people with disabilities all too often hear from people who should really, really know better: doctors (and other medical personnel including but not limited to nurses and EMTs, but primarily doctors).

My personal "favourite" is when I see a doctor for a follow-up appointment after they've ordered some tests, and they announce to me, "Great news! You don't have [insert diagnosis here]!" without actually having the real good news that they've identified the cause of the symptoms I came to them about. Especially when this is then followed by them essentially washing their hands of me, as they've looked for "everything" and "all the tests came out normal." Thanks, genius, unless your statement alone magically makes my body work again, it's not helpful at all.

I know other people probably have their own contributions to this category of fail!statements and fail!questions, and other people may come up with better phrasing than mine for many of them. (Brevity, alas, is rarely one of my virtues.) So please, contribute your own "favourite" inanities you've heard from doctor after doctor.

Another favourite of mine is "I'm not filling out any disability paperwork for patients (any more)" -- sometimes phrased as, "If you want the doctor to fill out disability paperwork, there's a fee of $___ for each form, which your insurance won't cover because oh right, it's actually illegal for us to charge for that especially when we're already billing for the office visit."

Then there's "No, I won't prescribe that medication for you, even though it's neither controlled nor a risk for addiction, and I actually don't have any particular reason for refusing, I'm just being stubborn."

Yet another favourite, though I haven't run into it personally in years, is "Either you really have that symptom/condition, OR you know some technical terms used to describe it in medical literature and other exclusive content like WebMD and Wikipedia; any patient who comes in and uses the correct terms to discuss either a symptom they claim to have or a specific diagnosis they want to be checked for is obviously either a hypochondriac, a malingerer or both!"

edited to add:
"If you just go back to your regular routine, you'll be feeling yourself again in no time." (Yes, this is different when it's actual medical advice and also being given in place of appropriate medical care, as opposed to when some doubtless-well-meaning layperson says it.)
and
"Your presenting with both symptom A and symptom B is suspicious, despite the fact that at least a dozen recognised illnesses feature both symptoms as common and/or diagnostic."
and
"I see that you're taking medication X, based on which I will assume that you have condition B, even though you helpfully wrote right next to the medication name and dosage that the medication was actually prescribed to treat condition A, and even though you wrote in the medical-history section that you have condition A and made no mention of condition B."

Although I've heard things like "but you're so young!" and "you seem fine / don't look disabled" from doctors and other medical professionals, I'm aiming for things which are profession-specific and haven't already been addressed on one of the other bingo cards.

As you can see I need help trimming these down from rant-size to bingo-card size, so suggestions toward that end are appreciated.


While I'm here... I've been wondering how screen readers and/or other assistive technology handle emphasised text, be it bolded, underlined, italicised or formatted with some other HTML tag, and whether some tags are more likely than others to get dropped by (or become illegible to) people using various kinds of assistive technology. Toward that end, some examples so people can tell how their tech does at letting them know what formatting the writer has applied:

1. This sentence has no HTML formatting tags.

2.
This sentence is enclosed in HTML "pre" tags.


3. This sentence is enclosed in HTML "B" (bold) tags.

4. This sentence is enclosed in HTML "U" (underline) tags.

5. This sentence is enclosed in HTML "I" (italic) tags.

6. This sentence is enclosed in HTML "em" (emphasis) tags.

7. This sentence is enclosed in HTML "S" (strikethrough) tags.

8. This sentence is enclosed in HTML "sub" (subscript) tags.

9. This sentence is enclosed in HTML "sup" (superscript) tags.

Those are most of the tags I use. If there are other tags other people use frequently and are willing to change their usage of, if necessary, so that their intended meaning can be better conveyed to those using assistive technology -- or tags that people who use assistive technology know don't come through for them -- please comment, and I'll modify this post to reflect those, too. Please also note which software and/or hardware you're using, not so much for me as for other AT users, so we can helpfully compare how text renders in different programs. I encourage people using magnification (or some other assistive technology) rather than or in addition to a screen-reader to contribute their experiences as well.

Finally, does the "fandom heart" emoticon, <3 (less-than / pointy-bracket numeral-three) get lost in translation for anyone? Would the ASCII ♥ be better?

(Please also suggest any tags -- post tags, that is, not html tags -- I ought to have included but didn't. Or, actually, other html tags would also be good! But for different purposes.)
jesse_the_k: Macro photo of left eye of my mostly black border collie mutt (expectant)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
Over on the [site community profile] dw_accessibility community, I proposed a way to make it easier to follow who's talking with whom on long comment threads.

Particularly if you use a smaller screen (netbook, phone), large print, audio or braille to read your Dreamwidth circle, I'd love your sampling the discussion and contributing your thoughts.
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
[personal profile] hope's post Nerdy PSA: Accessibility Tips for the Casual Coder is a good resource for how to make your blog or website more accessible for screen reader technology. Screen readers are tech that blind or sight-impaired people can use to read the internet (they read text aloud).

What I've done is bookmark this page and open it if I'm constructing a blog post in which I want to pay particular attention to access issues (say for instance one with images, but I try to do work on this generally, little by little). I also picked out a couple of things off hope's list of suggestions to work on, rather than tackling the whole list at once.

---

One in particular that I would like to see more of is descriptive links. Personally I'm much less likely to click on a link if I do not know where it will lead me.

So a non-descriptive link looks like: hey this is cool and pretty!

And a descriptive link looks like: Here is a cool photo on Flickr of some horses

The same link with a title tag: Photo of horses on Flickr (note how there is a text box that appears if you mouse over the link) ETA: See comments for why not to rely on title tags

Another thing to do is just tell the reader somewhere in your post where your links direct. For example. Hey, I like the movie Pitch Black (link goes to IMDB).

----

Here is the code for including a warning that is accessible for a screen reader. (Warnings are for posts/stories that have triggering content or triggering language).

(<a title="Skip this Warning" href="#skip">skip</a>)<span title="This is a spoiler. Highlight to read." style="color:#666;background-color:#666;">
Text-you-want-to-be-hidden-under-the-gray-bar
</span><a name="skip"></a>

which creates:
(skip)
Text-you-want-to-be-hidden-under-the-gray-bar



The "skip" link lets a speaking web browser stay silent about the warning.

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