jesse_the_k: Macro photo of left eye of my mostly black border collie mutt (Default)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
Call For Papers

Journal of Fandom Studies: Disability, Pedagogy, and Identity in Fan Studies Classrooms

Disability stands as a unique category of identity and experience, as it has multiple entry points, and its duration varies from person to person. In the classroom, these disabilities, as well as the other gender, sexual, and racial identities with which they intersect become “identities-in-process” (Gray-Rosendale and Birnley 2011, pp 218). The popular culture, and by implication Fan Studies, classrooms in which these students learn become places to grapple with the questions born from the multiple, complex identities of students with disabilities.

As Fan Studies classrooms develop emerging pedagogies and consider how students’ identities impact their engagements with media texts, the question arises of how teaching fandom impacts the lived realities of students and instructors. For students and instructors with disabilities, this different representation and engagement may be particularly fraught.

  • How does a consideration of disability as a category of identity play out when teaching fan studies?
  • How can we interrogate the assumed “safety” of fan spaces?
  • How does such an interrogation impact our understanding of Fan Studies classrooms as “safe spaces” as well?
  • How do we as Fan Studies scholars and teachers resist the medical model of disability by avoiding diagnostic labels?
  • How do we explore and incorporate a pedagogy that critically examines disability and its intersecting identities in the classroom?
  • How do we study disability in fandom and in the media texts themselves and open our classrooms to that exploration?
  • How does fandom reveal the politicized nature of identity and disability in ways larger cultural readings do not?

This special issue of the Journal of Fandom Studies aims to investigate the intersection of disability studies and fan studies. We welcome all explorations of this intersection, but are especially excited about discussions of how the pedagogy we employ, as well as the texts we teach and identities we embody, impact our students and our teaching.

We encourage you to define disability broadly as you examine your chosen text. Analysis of texts of all media are accepted and encouraged.

Submit proposals of 500–600 words by May 12, 2017 to issue guest editor

Katherine Anderson Howell

khowell@gwu.edu

for July 2018 publication.

davidgillon: A pair of crutches, hanging from coat hooks, reflected in a mirror (Default)
[personal profile] davidgillon

Call For Proposals: Disability and/in/through fanfiction

I don't think I got round to mentioning this when it first came up. It's theoretically closed now, but they just said on the Fans for Accessible Conventions FB group that if anyone is working on something, get in touch and they'll see what they can do.

Call for proposals

Fri, Jan. 8th, 2016 11:21 am
sasha_feather: sirius black from harry potter films (sirius black)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Call for Proposals
Canadian Journal of Disability Studies
Disability and/in/through fan fiction

http://cjds.uwaterloo.ca/index.php/cjds/announcement/view/10

Submissions are due 15 April 2016 and can be emailed to Cath Duchastel de M. at: electrocrip@gmail.com and Bridget Liang at b.jianjian@gmail.com.
jesse_the_k: Human in professorial suit but with head of Golden Retriever, labeled "Woof" (doctor dog to you)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
Published three times a year, the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies combines essays, ideas, and discussion between academics, non-academics and folks like us.

They've just issued a call for submissions for their theme issue on the relationships between fanfiction and disability.

The full call for papers is here:
http://cjds.uwaterloo.ca/index.php/cjds/announcement/view/10

A taste of what they want follows:
quote begins
However, disability and accessibility have not been explored in either academic or fan scholarship as crucial aspects of fanfiction practices, and disabled fans and fanfiction writers have not been included as significant contributors to online fanfiction communities.

Yet, disability and fanfiction are in a complicated relationship with one another. Fanfiction loves its disabled characters ( Stiles from Teen Wolf, Hiccup from How to Train Your Dragon, Homestuck, House, River Tam from Firefly), and loves to disable its characters (Harry Potter is iconic in this respect), to get all the feels, to explore all the possibilities, and because you hurt those you love, a lot, especially in fanfic.

Many fans and fan creators have identified online as disabled and/or people with disabilities/impairments. Fans are sharing their experiences and having discussions about disability representation in fandoms and fanfiction, about ableism and accessibility. How disability manifests in online fanfiction works and communities remains to be brought into play in critical disability studies and in fan studies.
[ snip ]
We welcome single and multiple authored pieces. Formats can be written, video (must be captioned), audio (must include transcript).
[ snip ]
Submissions are due 15 April 2016 and can be emailed to
Cath Duchastel de M. at: electrocrip@gmail.com

quote ends


Please signal boost like there's no tomorrow.
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Accessing the Future anthology is accepting short fiction submissions, and is paying pro rates (6 cents a word). Deadline November 30.

Details at The Future Fire.

We want stories that place emphasis on intersectional narratives (rejection of, undoing, and speaking against ableist, heteronormative, racist, cissexist, and classist constructions) and that are informed by an understanding of disability issues and politics at individual and institutional levels. We want to read stories from writers that think critically about how prosthetic technologies, new virtual and physical environments, and genetic modifications will impact human bodies, our communities, and planet.
sasha_feather: Max from Dark Angel (Max from Dark Angel)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Academic Editing Canada:
Call for proposals: Anomalous embodiment in YA spec fic. Jun 4 2014.

We are particularly looking for contributions on works which either (1) interrogate, problematize the dominant discourse on normative embodiment present in YA fiction, (2) emphasize, by a play on repetition or any other means, the limitations of the traditional discourse on the ‘abnormal’ or ‘disabled’ body, and signal the inherent violence of such normative paradigms, and/or (3) propose an alternative approach to the anomalous body.
jesse_the_k: Ultra modern white fabric interlaced to create strong weave (interdependence)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
Disability Studies has always paid lip service to including contributions from community members (aka "independent scholars.") Here's a chance for folks who've thought about comics to share their ideas with a wider audience. I've seen that one really great article from an outsider can have a deep impact on how academia perceives the world, theorizes about it, and thus teaches us to shape it.

I wish I were that writing person, but maybe you are?

--- begin forward ---
We invite proposals for chapters in a volume on disability and graphic literature for the new Literary Disability series from Palgrave Macmillan edited by David Bolt, Elizabeth Donaldson, and Julia Miele Rodas. Feats of Clay: Disability and Graphic Narrative will scrutinize the ways that disability has been employed in comic books, graphic nonfiction, graphic novels, underground comix, and/or webcomics. Our aim is to interrogate standard assumptions about disability and sequential art in order to open up new approaches and potential collaborations between both of these vital areas of study.

Some possible but not exclusive topics include analyses of the range of representations of disabled figures in both superhero comics and graphic narratives; considerations of the role of the visual in offering multimodal engagement with the textual experience of disability (beyond character, plot, and theme); critical investigations of how the systems of meaning associated with disability studies (see Donna Haraway, Tobin Siebers, and others) overlap with or challenge the language of sequential art (as theorized by Thierry Groensteen, Scott McCloud, and others); extended examinations of specific comic book characters (such as Batgirl/Oracle, Daredevil/Matt Murdock, Professor Xavier, or Cyborg/Victor Stone); delineations of disability as an organizing logic in ongoing graphic series (like Fantastic Four and Doom Patrol); and theorizations of the role of disability in the texts of individual graphic narrative writers (such as David B., Alison Bechdel, Marisa Acocella Marchetto, Harvey Pekar, and Chris Ware).

Send 500-word abstracts to Chris Foss (cfoss@umw.edu), Jonathan Gray (jgray@jjay.cuny.edu), and Zach Whalen (zwhalen@umw.edu) by Dec 15th.
--- forward ends ---
jesse_the_k: Macro photo of left eye of my mostly black border collie mutt (Default)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
[Jesse notes: This is a call for proposals for an academic conference in disability studies, not an actual event at any Comic-Con]

This symposium will provide participants with the opportunity to engage in a broad array of reflective discussions about the representations of disability that exist “beneath the surface” and explicitly within mainstream popular cultures both nationally and internationally, particularly the popular culture phenomena that are comic books, graphic novels, and manga.

April 2013 - Syracuse University - Syracuse, NY USA

DEADLINE for Proposals EXTENDED until: January 25, 2013

Michael Bérubé tells us that “every representation of disability has the potential to shape the way ‘disability’ is understood in general culture, and some of those representations can in fact do extraordinary powerful—or harmful—cultural and political work” (1997, p. B4).

More details available on their site:
http://crippingthecon.com/?page_id=63&wpmp_tp=1

I've linked to the mobile version because the full-screen is not very accessible to me as a large print user (and WordPress sites, I've heard it told, are wicked difficult to make accessible). See my next post.

Web: http://crippingthecon.com or http://crippingthecon.info
Twitter: [twitter.com profile] cripcon
Facebook: https://facebook.com/CrippingTheCon
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
The editor of the WisCon Chronicles is looking for more submissions, particularly regarding the portrayal of disability in speculative fiction.

Here's the LJ post!

She says:

I'm also willing to consider submissions from people who have never attended WisCon before, but who would like to. So as long as you know what the con is and isn't about, I'm all ears.
jesse_the_k: those words in red on white sign (be aware of invisibility)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
The WisCon Chronicles have now become an annual tradition, published by Aqueduct Press. This year's edition (covering WisCon 36, which ended nine days ago) will feature disability as a theme. Jo Vanderhooft will be editing. Her call for submissions is right here

http://wiscon.livejournal.com/362591.html

Spread the word!
jesse_the_k: Photo of baby wearing huge black glasses  (eyeglasses baby)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
This announcement came over one of my academic listservs. Those of us reading are, in fact, experts in how new communication technologies affect disabled people's lives throughout their education, as well as in adulthood.

The full call is at this link; here are some highlights. highlights of the CFP  )
jesse_the_k: Panda doll wearing black eye mask, hands up in the spotlight, dropping money bag on floor  (bandit panda)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
There's a two-day conference this fall which looks like it needs us!

Call for Papers
DISABILITY & POPULAR CULTURE
Midwest Popular Culture Association (MPCA)
2011 Conference
http://www.mpcaaca.org

October 14-16, 2011
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Hilton Milwaukee City Center

Deadline for Paper Submissions: April 30, 2011

The Disability & Popular Culture area of the MPCA invites proposals (or abstracts) for papers on any aspect of the intersection of disability and popular culture. All topics, approaches, and perspectives related to disability and popular culture are welcome. Interdisciplinary perspectives are encouraged, as are discussions of new directions in disability studies and popular culture studies.

Proposals should be 250-300 words in length, and must be received by April 30, 2010.

More information available here:
http://www.mpcaaca.org/conference/
They do have travel grants for graduate
students, more at
http://mpcaaca.org/about/grants.html

Proposals and inquiries should be sent by e-mail to the Disability & Popular Culture area chair

Asim Ali
aali@umd.edu
were_duck: a woman corrects the grammar of graffitti that says "anarchy forever!" (anarchy in the library)
[personal profile] were_duck
via @lizhenry on Twitter

I thought this contest might be of interest to the science fiction writers and fans of this community!

Excerpted from Redstone Science Fiction's call for submissions of visions of an accessible future. [full announcement on their website]

Redstone Science Fiction is calling for contest submissions that incorporate the values discussed in the essay The Future Imperfect by Sarah Einstein.

What does a world, or space station, or whatever look like when it has been designed to be accessible to everyone and how would people live together there?

The submissions should portray disability as a simple fact, not as something to be overcome or something to explain why a character is evil. The submissions should also incorporate the portrayal of disability in a world where universal access is a shared cultural value.

July 2017

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