ambyr: pebbles arranged in a spiral on sand (nature sculpture by Andy Goldsworthy) (Pebbles)
[personal profile] ambyr
I thought this Whirling Nerdish blog post about the portrayal of disability in Kameron Hurley's latest fantasy novel might be interesting to some people here:

Asthma and THE MIRROR EMPIRE

As I write this, my hands are shaking. Not because I'm distressed. Not because I'm tired or hungry or my blood sugar is low. They're shaking because I took my inhaler. I woke up this morning, and for some reason, I couldn't take in a full breath.

...

Kameron Hurley's The Mirror Empire features a main character that has asthma. I'm only about 100 pages into the book, but so far, this girl is my favorite character. Because she's got a strong spirit, she's brave as fuck, and she gets shit done. But when things get real, when she has to physically exert herself--climbing stairs, fleeing bad guys, etc., she gets wheezy; she gets short of breath.
ysabetwordsmith: Paranormal detective Brenda in a wheelchair (PIE)
[personal profile] ysabetwordsmith
Based on an audience poll, there will be a bonus fishbowl session in my series P.I.E. on Tuesday, September 16. 

This series is urban fantasy about a wheelchair-riding private detective who handles the really weird cases, and her able-bodied but kind of accident-prone policeman boyfriend.  When the fishbowl theme is something that doesn't get much attention, I try to spread the word to relevant audiences.  So please tell any of your friends who are mobility-impaired or otherwise interested in this topic that it will be featured in a prompt call where they can come suggest things to be written.  If you're new to P.I.E. then you can find links to all its published poems via the series page; several these were prompted by folks with limited mobility.
sasha_feather: Black, white, and red image of woman with futuristic helmet (Sci Fi Woman)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Paper Knife: Accessing the Future Guest Post: How Not to do Disability SF

I invited Kathryn and Djibril over to Paper Knife, to talk about a few of the stories that they feel get portrayals of disability spectacularly wrong.

content note: discussion of eugenics; apologism in comments.
sasha_feather: Black, white, and red image of woman with futuristic helmet (Sci Fi Woman)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Post about Drax from Guardians of the Galaxy (image)

Transcript:
I took my little brother (who falls on the autism spectrum) to see Guardians of the Galaxy and after this scene he lit up like a Christmas tree and screamed "He's like me! He can't do metaphors!" And for the rest of the film, my brother stared at Drax in a state of rapture:

(images of Rocket and Drax)
Rocket: Metaphors are gonna go over his head.
Drax: Nothing goes over my head. My reflexes are too fast. I will catch them.

So for the last 6 days I have heard my brother repeatedly quote all of the Drax lines from the movie verbatim (of one his talents), begin studying vocabulary test words, and tell everyone he knows that people with autism can also be superheroes.

Now I'm not saying that Drax the Destroyer is, or was ever intended to be, austistic. All I am saying is that it warmed my heart for my brother to have an opportunity to identify himself with a character known for his strength, badassness, and honor. And that is pretty damn awesome.

So while I adored Guardians of the Galaxy as a great fun loving film with cool characters, I can do nothing but thank Marvel Studios and Dave Bautista for finally bringing a superhero to the screen that my little brother can relate to.

(end transcript)

Disability in SF

Fri, Aug. 22nd, 2014 02:12 pm
sasha_feather: Black, white, and red image of woman with futuristic helmet (Sci Fi Woman)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Kathryn Allan at Pornokitsch: Friday 5: Five Positive Representations of disability in SF

I want to highlight five stories that present atypical and non-normative experiences of embodiment in creative, engaging, and thought-provoking ways. Technology is not always wanted or accessible as a “cure all.” People with disabilities can be three-dimensional characters! Each of the five stories on my list of “good disability in SF examples” examines the complex diversity of human bodies and minds.

Hawkeye #19

Fri, Aug. 1st, 2014 05:25 pm
sasha_feather: Clint from the Avengers drawing his bow (Hawkeye)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
AV Club: Hawkeye 19 uses Deafness to help a Broken Clint Barton to find his Voice

Has a bit of ableist language; otherwise a good article.

The easiest way for readers to see more diversity is to support titles that feature diverse casts and creative teams. Larime Taylor is a disabled comics creator born with arthrogryposis, and he writes, draws, tones, and letters his work with his mouth. His Top Cow series, A Voice In The Dark, is a chilling psychological thriller featuring a primarily female cast, and it returns in September with a new first issue in full color. Valiant’s Harbinger stars a disabled cast member in John “Torque” Torkelson, a teenage boy that is paralyzed from the waist down, but can project solid psychic holograms that turn him into a powerful superhero. Gail Simone introduced a new disabled superheroine to the DC universe with Vengeance Moth in The Movement, but low sales prompted that book’s cancellation after a year.

Bleeding Cool: How Hawkeye #19 Portrays the World of a Deaf SuperHero to a Hearing Audience, for Next Year's Eisner Awards

Has some images of the comic; does not appear to have image descriptions. If anyone has the wherewithal to put descriptions in the comments there or here, that would be cool. There are also several typos in the article, FYI.
jesse_the_k: Well nourished white woman riding black Quantum 4400 powerchair off the right edge, chased by the word "powertool" (JK powertool)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
I was under a rock. I just encountered "SF Signal." They host three podcasts as well as hundreds of announcements, reviews, interviews, "books received," and thematic series. (They've been doing this for more than a decade, and won the Best Fanzine HUGO in 2012 and 2013.)

One of those series may be of general interest here:

Special Needs in Strange Worlds

I'm not in love with the title, but the articles themselves have useful info.
sasha_feather: Toph and Katara from avatar: the last airbender cartoon (Toph and Katara)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Christopher Shinn at the Atlantic: Disability is not just a metaphor

The late, disabled playwright John Belluso had a theory about why actors who play disabled characters often win Oscars: It is reassuring for the audience to see an actor like Daniel Day Lewis, after so convincingly portraying disability in My Left Foot, get up from his seat in the auditorium and walk to the stage to accept his award. There is a collective "Phew" as people see it was all an illusion. Society’s fear and loathing around disability, it seems, can be magically transcended.
jesse_the_k: Well nourished white woman riding black Quantum 4400 powerchair off the right edge, chased by the word "powertool" (JK powertool)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
Just caught up with some of my Blogging Against Disablism Day/May 1 blog posts. (I own my slowness). One particularly apt post talked about educating kids about what "disability" means using the Incredible Hulk and modeling clay.

From Never That Easy, 1 May 2014
begin quote  "And I guess it isn't exactly super-normal that you change into a big green monster when you're angry either" suggested her brother, ALMOST apologetically. "Well, I'm not sure disabled and normal are exact opposites there, bud" I corrected him gently (because you try and correct a 14 year-old any other way), "but yeah, I think maybe Hulking out could stretch into the disability category if we really tried, because it's something in his body that he's not always got control over and a lot of disabilities -" I gestured to myself "are kind of like that. Cousin Sara once called her seizures Hulking out." (Our cousin has epilepsy.)
 quote ends
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
A review from 2013 about the show "Legit" (which I recently watched the first season of on Netflix!)

Think Progress: With 'Legit', FX Tackles Disability, Independent Living, and Sex, and makes it all very Funny

----

GabbySilang at Tumblr:

And now, too many words about mental illness in s4 of Rookie Blue

This post discusses the portrayal of a character with bipolar disorder.
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
The Third Glance: Disney's Frozen and Autism

I’m not saying that Elsa is an autistic character. I’m not saying that autism is a superpower like the magic in the animated film (obviously it is totally different!) All I’m saying is that Elsa’s childhood and coming of age experience that is portrayed in the film has a number of parallels to my own life, especially based around my being autistic. And I wanted to recognize that, because it made me really really happy. I almost never relate to movie characters that way, but I did, and it made me smile.
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Derek Handley writing at Jim Hines' Blog:
Representation Without Understanding

At a very basic level, wheelchair users are not an under-represented group in fiction. We’re just very misunderstood.

Evil Albino Trope

Tue, Feb. 25th, 2014 02:49 pm
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Nalini Haynes writing at Jim Hines' blog:
Evil Albino Trope is Evil

The evil albino trope is lazy writing, creating a sense of ‘other’ by victimising a small minority group. The evil albino trope alienates albinos, punishing us for looking different and suffering bad eyesight. Reinforcing perceptions of incompetence and evil-ness in this people group is discrimination and victimisation.
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Ada Hoffmann writing at Jim Hines' blog: Autism, Representation, and Success

Maybe we, as autistic people, need to be shown warts and all sometimes. Maybe what we need most desperately to see is that we can be visibly disabled, and unsuccessful, and fail to meet NT expectations in all kinds of ways, and be treated with all sorts of horrible ableism, and still be human. And still be lovable and worth something, even if no one else sees it.
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
[personal profile] kate_nepveu: Arisia Panel: Blindness: More than Metaphor

Description:

Blindness has been used as a metaphor in fiction for centuries, a way to talk about knowledge, enlightenment, ignorance and agency. But for some people it is a simple fact of everyday life. We have moved away from using gender and appearance strictly as metaphor in stories (pretty = good, ugly = bad). Are we ready to look at disabilities as part of who people are, and start including them in more kinds of stories and in more diverse roles?

Gann Monroe, Sarah Smith, Rachel Tanenhaus, W. A. (Bill) Thomasson, Tanya Washburn (m)
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Susan Nussbaum, HuffPo Chicago:
Disabled Characters in Fiction

Disabled characters are written into stories for one reason: the disability. Do most people actually believe real disabled people spend our days obsessing about being cured? Or rhapsodizing about killing ourselves? Here is the truth: Disabled people barely ever even think about our disabilities. When we do think about them, it's usually because we are dealing with an oppressive, systemic problem, such as employment discrimination. Can't there ever be a disabled character in a book or film just because?

From 11/19/2013
jesse_the_k: Macro photo of my Blue Heeler Lucy's deep brown left eye (Default)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
Tor.com is hosting threads on the three episodes comprising Season 3 of the BBC's Sherlock. They're timed to the UK broadcast times, and enthusiasts like me who take advantage of TunnelBear and iPlayer to stream them before their U.S. premiere.

major SPOILERS for SHERLOCK season 3, episode 2 really SPOILERS )
sasha_feather: Retro-style poster of skier on pluto.   (Default)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
[personal profile] sqbr: Why I don't want to live in Night Vale

As the most recent episode (34 - A Beautiful Dream) made explicitely clear, this is a town where ableism is rampant for exactly the same reasons it is in the real world (albeit with a surreal Night Vale spin), where disabled children are held up as tragic, pitiable figures doomed to misery as their calls for accessibility are either ignored or have to be destroyed for the greater good.

Tumblr: Welcome to Disabled Vale

A repository for Welcome To Night Vale headcanons and fanwork featuring disabled characters.

Unfortunately, many of the images at this Tumblr lack image descriptions.
jesse_the_k: Happy & sad monster dolls over "bipolar = 2X Fun" (Bipolar = Twice the Fun)
[personal profile] jesse_the_k
I've now spent more than fifteen minutes on Facebook, and I'm still overwhelmed. Perhaps this group will be of interest to us?

Beneath the SURFACE: Disability and Popular Culture
is a digital repository that will provide scholars, practitioners, editors, and its own readership with the opportunity to engage in a broad array of reflective discussions about the representations of disability that exist “beneath the surface” and explicitly within mainstream cultures both nationally and internationally. Genres and subgenres that do not typically receive sustained attention in mainstream scholarly literature will be showcased.

Tragically, they first chose an offensive name, which lives on in its URL
https://www.facebook.com/groups/TwihardsGleeksAndAvatards

(no subject)

Sun, Oct. 13th, 2013 06:04 pm
sasha_feather: dolphin and zebra gazing at each other across glass (dolphin and zebra)
[personal profile] sasha_feather
Liz Henry: Taking up Too Much Space

I am not an emergency or an obstacle! Get used to it! My public presence will just have to be YOUR mild inconvenience!

Liz Henry: The Superfest Dissie Awards

It was lovely to feel the audience reaction all around me as we cheered and booed how bad all the performances were as they played off stereotypes and made disabled people the butt of humor. It was often a hard call which movie to boo the loudest for as the judges watched and listened to the crowd, because the spectrum of Hollywood badness was so vast!

October 2014

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